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David_D ·

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David_D
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  • Guardians of the Galaxy (Complete Movie Thread-- Now With Spoilers)

    In Guardians there was beat that was to do with evacuating the city, as well as a whole sequence in the climax about Rocket and the pirates working WITH the Nova Corp to defend the city. And we were meant to believe the city was evacuated by the time the ship crashed. Now, sure, it is actually ridiculous to believe the city COULD be evacuated that fast. But but making a point of it, they gave us permission to believe that.


    After years of war with Kree, is it so hard to believe that the city would have a high-tech, high-speed city evacuation system and that the citizens would be well-drilled in its use?


    SOMEBODY is looking for a No Prize.


    We're not talking a modern-day Earth metropolis here.

    If they have the foresight to develop an all-fighters-gang-up-and-make-a-giant-energy-web/cage-thing just in case bad guy mustn't touch the planet, does really efficient civil defense seem so far out?
    We didn't see that, but I think that is fair to imagine.

    I didn't say you weren't getting the No-Prize ;)
  • Guardians of the Galaxy (Complete Movie Thread-- Now With Spoilers)

    In Guardians there was beat that was to do with evacuating the city, as well as a whole sequence in the climax about Rocket and the pirates working WITH the Nova Corp to defend the city. And we were meant to believe the city was evacuated by the time the ship crashed. Now, sure, it is actually ridiculous to believe the city COULD be evacuated that fast. But but making a point of it, they gave us permission to believe that.


    After years of war with Kree, is it so hard to believe that the city would have a high-tech, high-speed city evacuation system and that the citizens would be well-drilled in its use?
    SOMEBODY is looking for a No Prize.
  • Guardians of the Galaxy (Complete Movie Thread-- Now With Spoilers)

    Didn't like seeing yet another huge spaceship slam into a heavily populated city.


    An explicitly evacuated city.


    How about the running gun battle through the very much unevavuated Nowhere? Ok since it was Mos Eisley in a Celestial a Skull?


    Here's what you need to know. No one cares about violence in Marvel movies. Not sure if its the humor or the bright colors, but one or both of those things means they can have people dying left and right and most people go "huh? what violence?"
    I think this actually speaks to is the success of the tone they struck in those Marvel movies. Sure, there is a lot of violence and destruction, and that is not to be discounted. But the are also mindful of showing the heroes trying to avoid that, or save people. Sometimes, for better or for worse as a culture, those are the things that allow viewers to not be as concerned about the cartoon violence they are seeing. Not because they don't see it, but because they feel like the characters who they are supposed to be on the side of in the fictional crisis they are watching are not themselves blase about the fictional people in peril.

    I think it is something Marvel movies have succeeded in being mindful about. And it doesn't take much-- a few minutes, or even seconds, spent showing that the heroes care about the civilians go a long way. Some that come to mind off the top of my head:

    In Guardians there was beat that was to do with evacuating the city, as well as a whole sequence in the climax about Rocket and the pirates working WITH the Nova Corp to defend the city. And we were meant to believe the city was evacuated by the time the ship crashed. Now, sure, it is actually ridiculous to believe the city COULD be evacuated that fast. But but making a point of it, they gave us permission to believe that.

    In Iron Man 2, Tony and Rhodey lead the drones away from the fair where the people are into that empty arboretum to fight them there.

    In Avengers, when they are dividing the labor, I am pretty sure there is a moment where, I think it is Hawkeye and Black Widow, are tasked with saving people while the others fight the aliens. Plus Iron Man's would be sacrifice is all about taking the danger away from the people. And throughout the climactic battle the film even tracks the experience of a civilian- the waitress in the restaurant across from Grand Central- to give a perspective of what it was like to be caught in the middle of that, and be SAVED by the Avengers.

    In Winter Soldier they evacuate the headquarters, even see a shot of people running out of the buliding, before the helicarrier comes down.

    I think that those sorts of things make the violence and big moments of destruction seem lighter in tone than they are in some other movies, because it seems like the heroes (and, to some extent, the filmmakers) are trying to make us feel like things aren't as bad for the civilians as it could be. Now, culturally, is it better that we can have PG-13 films full of violence-with-no-blood and have a light toned movie make us feel comfortable with that? Well, that is a separate conversation. But I will agree that Marvel movies tend to get a pass on this, but I think it is because they are purposefully, and sometimes skillfully, making a tone where the casualties are low and the heroes are mindful of the little people.
  • Which Female Marvel Superheroine Can Carry Her Own Film?

    *pours fuel on the fire*

    http://www.comicbookmovie.com/fansites/nailbiter111/news/?a=105408
    What you may not know is that women are coming out in droves to see Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy. Box Office Mojo reports that 44 percent of Guardians of the Galaxy audience was female, "which is the biggest share ever for a Marvel Cinematic Universe movie (the previous high was 40 percent for The Avengers)." Suck on that Whedon! Additionally: "the audience was 55 percent over the age of 25." Go, old people!
    Yeah, you suck on that, Whedon! Suck on the fact that the success of Avengers. . . and probably the fact that Avengers has been available for streaming and home viewing for a long time now maybe helped turn out a female audience to the theater for Guardians, after they gave your movie a chance at home, to see another fun looking superhero movie. Guardians that says "From the Studio that brought you The Avengers" on the poster right under the title. You suck on that, Whedon! You loser!

    PS- to be clear, I know those are just the words that the blogger @TheOriginalGMan‌ was quoting, not his, and wasn't even the point he was looking to make. I just think it is such typical half-informed logic to somehow see Guardians and Avengers in competition, as opposed to thinking through the ways in which Avengers built audience for Guardians and expanded who that audience might be. But, hey, on the Internet, why think about cause and effect when you can type "suck it!", right?
  • Episode 1495 Talkback - BOMC: Saga, Vol. 1 and 2

    It's just one of those books that seems to appeal to a certain kind of audience, I guess. Some are going to love it, and some aren't. I'm with Greg, in that the story just isn't for me.
    I would never push the book on someone that doesn't like it. But I will add, just looking at where Saga lands in the sales charts that if it appeals to a certain audience, then I would say that is a pretty big certain audience. I believe only Walking Dead (a title 100 issues older, and with a TV show) consistently beats it in the direct market sales. And Saga has often sold gangbusters digitally, according to what Comixology charts we get to see.

    Again, that is not to say that everyone should love it, or if there is anything wrong with you if you don't like it, or even try a second issue. You like what you like. But I would say that the numbers it sells- especially for an indie, non-licensed, original title- indicate that it is maybe not so polarizing. I feel like it might be downplaying the success and appeal of this book to say that it is for a certain audience. Because the numbers just make it look like a pretty broad success. In a crowded market, usually ruled by the Big 2, it has found a Big 2 sized audience.

    Sure, there might be some of us that vocally really love it, and some who may vocally really not. That may seem polarizing. But somewhere in the middle there are a lot of people who are consistently buying it. In numbers that a lot of Marvel and DC books would love to have:
    21. Saga (Image)

    05/2012: Saga #3 - 38,895
    05/2014: -

    ====

    06-07/2013: -
    08/2013: Saga #13 - 55,372 (+3.8%)
    09/2013: Saga #14 - 55,585 (+0.4%)
    10/2013: Saga #15 - 54,816 (-1.4%)
    11/2013: Saga #16 - 54,593 (-0.4%)
    12/2013: Saga #17 - 53,264 (-2.4%)
    01/2014: Saga #18 - 53,139 (-0.4%)
    02-04/2014: -
    05/2014: Saga #19 - 55,422 (+4.3%)
    Another new arc, new boost in sales. In fact sales return to within a couple hundred copies of the beginning of the last arc, which is very healthy.