Chris Roberson ends his relationship with DC Comics

Well after his 1st arc of Fairest (the Fables spinoff) he is ending his working relationship w/ DC Comics.

http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2012/04/chris-roberson-ends-his-relationship-with-dc-comics/

While I enjoyed both Fables Cinderella miniseries very much & appreciated his efforts on Superman Grounded arc once JMS bailed. I look forward to see what he plans on doing next in the comics industry.

Matthew
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Comments

  • kfreemankfreeman Posts: 308
    Dang. I like iZombie, too. DIdn't realize it was getting canceled.
  • TrevTrev Posts: 298
    That comics alliance article is nuts. It's no different in comics than in any other industry. Hell it might be better thanks to the fan pressure.

    People have unrealistic expectations. They want the upside but not the down. I actually agree with JMS which I never thought would happen.

    I wish Roberson the best. He's a local guy so I'm sure I'll hear about his other projects. I'll miss seeing him and sturges on my plane to sdcc. It's kinda become a tradition for me.
  • John_SteedJohn_Steed Posts: 2,087
    ---I have left very high-paying jobs due to ethical issues and when you have your priorities straight in life it isn't hard to do at all, in fact it feels great,---
    100% agreed B-)
  • One of the things that is great about this age of comics is that people CAN leave the Big Two and do their work for other publishers, or themselves. Mark Waid is going to digital, Kirkman has carved out a niche at Image and other creators are leaving the main companies in order to do their own work.

    I respectfully disagree with JMS, who seems to say "You're going to get screwed, so deal with it." If you feel you work for an unethical company, you SHOULD be able to leave instead of sitting down, shutting up and taking it.
  • rkbrasserkbrasse Posts: 14
    Each person has to decide for themselves who and how they will support something. I applaud both Roberson and Brothers for their choice to put up and not shut up. One way you can tell a company you are not happy with them is to not spend money on their product and not work for them.
  • TorchsongTorchsong Posts: 1,390
    Good for Roberson. Hope he lands someplace good for both him as a creator and us as comic book lovers.
  • DoctorDoomDoctorDoom Posts: 1,624
    Good for him. He's a better man than I am.

    Personally, I'm more mercenary, and if it's high paying, I'd hang on as long as I can.
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 1,799
    And one last positive- considering the questionable cost/benefit analysis in going public with something like this- I think this was brave on Roberson's part. It can make readers (at least the ones plugged-in and involved enough to even hear about this sort of thing) stop and think about it. And that is worth doing.
  • ZhurrieZhurrie Posts: 596
    One of the things that is great about this age of comics is that people CAN leave the Big Two and do their work for other publishers, or themselves. Mark Waid is going to digital, Kirkman has carved out a niche at Image and other creators are leaving the main companies in order to do their own work.

    I respectfully disagree with JMS, who seems to say "You're going to get screwed, so deal with it." If you feel you work for an unethical company, you SHOULD be able to leave instead of sitting down, shutting up and taking it.

    Completely agree and that makes me extremely happy. I genuinely hope it continues that way too. Marvel and DC will always be able to screw over young up and comers hungry to make it so the usual comics continue to get made as they always have, and as they become established and disenfranchised with it all, they can branch out and do their own thing. Hopefully they can eventually skip that first step. I'd love to see someone with some clout (and who is living comfortably now) start up a digital effort to showcase new talent and without DRM and really force some change before things get too out of hand. It is perfect for this kind of thing and I'd support the hell out of it. As it is I am all about supporting any deserving creator-owned, indie, artist, and publisher like Archaia, Drawn & Quarterly, etc.
  • mguy1977mguy1977 Posts: 712
    Sigh. It seems you can't speak out against the big 2 in any way & you are canned even if you do quit. I still look forward to whatever Chris has planned in the future.

    Matthew
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 1,799
    At least based on what little we know of this situation, I think this was a foolish move on DC's part. By firing him, they basically just play the role he was giving them.
  • TrevTrev Posts: 298
    edited April 2012


    At least based on what little we know of this situation, I think this was a foolish move on DC's part. By firing him, they basically just play the role he was giving them.
    funny, I think the exact opposite. He brought it on himself.

    would you expect to be able to go to the press, bash your employer's practices and call them out and say you are done working there and then keep your job?
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 1,799
    edited April 2012


    At least based on what little we know of this situation, I think this was a foolish move on DC's part. By firing him, they basically just play the role he was giving them.


    funny, I think the exact opposite. He brought it on himself.

    would you expect to be able to go to the press, bash your employer's practices and call them out and say you are done working there and then keep your job?
    No. And I don't think he expected to, either. I think he expected them to do exactly what they did. Which now gives the story of his criticizing them more legs (and, as clearly from Willingham's comments, he has another project lined up, so was he really that concerned that they fire him before he could quit?)

    So I think it was foolish of DC to take his bait.
  • Chris Roberson is a great guy. We had the pleasure of talking to him on Legion of Substitute Podcasters. I wish him nothing but the best and will continue to support his works.
  • TrevTrev Posts: 298


    At least based on what little we know of this situation, I think this was a foolish move on DC's part. By firing him, they basically just play the role he was giving them.


    funny, I think the exact opposite. He brought it on himself.

    would you expect to be able to go to the press, bash your employer's practices and call them out and say you are done working there and then keep your job?


    No. And I don't think he expected to, either. I think he expected them to do exactly what they did. Which now gives the story of his criticizing them more legs (and, as clearly from Willingham's comments, he has another project lined up, so was he really that concerned that they fire him before he could quit?)

    So I think it was foolish of DC to take his bait.
    image

  • TorchsongTorchsong Posts: 1,390
    Yeah, dumb move on DC's part there.
  • ZhurrieZhurrie Posts: 596
    @David_D I agree, but I also do care and make these choices almost everywhere. I won't lie though, I grew up in a lower income household and to do so is a luxury that I don't push on anyone or look down on for not doing. I fully recognize that. I also am not militant about it, I do always make a best effort but I don't do without or go insane or I make due with what i can get until I can find a better alternative. Sometimes it is as simple as making sure I only buy DC/Marvel stuff second-hand, that way I'm not adding a single dollar to their coffers but I can still read something I want. But from the car I drive to my shoes to the artists I support I make sure as much as possible that I know who and what my money is going to.
  • DoctorDoomDoctorDoom Posts: 1,624
    I honestly didn't care either way before. I still don't, but still... I think DC made the wrong move.

    Even if he did earn it or whatever. (Not saying he did or didn't)
  • DC had every right to fire him, and in a lot of ways, they lose nothing doing so. Tiny are a business, and if one of the employees tries to take a crap on the product on their way out the door, you speed them along.

    Now, when you get to the ART of the book in question, I think it'll make for a bad story which may have the comic stumble out of the gate.
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 1,799
    edited April 2012
    DC had every right to fire him, and in a lot of ways, they lose nothing doing so. Tiny are a business, and if one of the employees tries to take a crap on the product on their way out the door, you speed them along.

    Now, when you get to the ART of the book in question, I think it'll make for a bad story which may have the comic stumble out of the gate.
    Of course they are within their rights to do so. Especially as I doubt he was even an employee, he was likely a contractor, so it is as easy as just not buying any more scripts from him. Unlike an employee, they don't even have to show cause.

    However, I would argue that, for those paying attention, they end up proving him right by doing so. All it will do is help spread the story. And live down to his opinion of them.
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 1,799
    By the way, for those interested in this story, the comments section at The Beat have really blown up over this, including comments from a number of known names. Makes for some interesting reading, if you are in the mood.
  • ZhurrieZhurrie Posts: 596
    The comments in that deadline link are excellent as well.
  • Reading the comments is pretty amazing...and not in a good way. The people who feel that anyone who doesn't want to work on work-for-hire characters is an idiot just baffles me. Do I like that Dan Slott wants to work on Spider-Man? Yes, and I enjoy his stories. I also enjoyed his stories on She Hulk, Batman and Ren & Stimpy, so when he writes something not owned by Marvel or DC or whoever, I'll try it as well.

    I love Grant Morrison's Batman, but I love The Invisibles more.

    Don't get me wrong, I love the super-hero stuff and the shared universe idea, but if someone feels that the company that owns them is distasteful to work for, why should we hate them for it?

    On a related note, it REALLY looks like "Before Watchmen" is making some creators re-evaluate working at DC under the new management. I wonder if this might lead to a boomlet in indy/creator owned books from people who used to work there....
  • ZhurrieZhurrie Posts: 596
    @SolitaireRose I truly hope so. Artists are beginning to realize that with the current changes in technology that they don't need to take this crap and they don't actually need the big two and Diamond and a few more middle-men taking their cut, they have the same power that musicians and other similar creative pursuits do with the ability to go it alone. I still think a modern day "Image" move but in the digital arena could be a game changer. They can keep their AvX and Before Watchmen, I've got stacks of great stuff to read from happy artists that have skill for days and no constraints. Every one of these articles makes me hopeful that those stacks will continue to grow too!
  • mguy1977mguy1977 Posts: 712
    While I as a reader I do not want to read "Before Watchmen", as a creator that is working for DC's new management unless you are the 5 or 6 top creators after Geoff Johns or Jim Lee you probably feel a little under appreciated there. They want "the bigger fish out there" aka bigger fame, bigger payday as a well known indie comic creator or Kirkman before KIRKMANIA & the lawsuit w/ Tony Moore. Will all the creators that leave DC (or Marvel) of them make it? Probably not but you can't blame them for trying to seek a new opportunity for themselves & their families.

    On a side note, Will "Before Watchmen" pull the rabbit out of the hat seemingly like Godfather II after the success of The Godfather or Batman Year One after Batman The Dark Knight Returns? I have strong reservations of that occurring but I would like to be proven wrong by the story's conclusion from all the fans that did read the event & had fun doing so.

    Matthew
  • PaulPaul Posts: 120
    Like @DarthKramer said, we talked to Chris on Legion of Substitute Podcasters a few months back, just after the announcement of the Star Trek/Legion series. He was a pleasure to talk to, and is a class act, and this has only confirmed that to me.

    Thinking of what @SolitaireRose said about Morrison's Invisibles being greater than Morrison's Batman, I wholeheartedly agree, and I love me some Morrison Batman. I feel the same way about Chris Roberson. I've enjoyed the things that he's put into his mainstream work. He did a great job of trying to make a silk purse of the sow's ear that JMS left him with on Superman, even as he was given the indignity of everyone being told that he was "working from JMS's notes" (there were no such notes) as well as the further indignity of being listed second in the credit box to the guy that wasn't doing any of the work anymore. He brings a lot of really cool touches to his mainstream comics work, but I'll take creator owned Roberson any day. I mean, the guy wrote a novel that combined time travel, alternate realities and The Beatles, so clearly all of my geek buttons were pressed in one fell swoop. I've continued to read his novels, and his comic work. iZombie, and Memorial are both fantastic. Whatever has his name on it next will certainly be purchased by me.

    DC dumping him off Fairest is certainly within their rights to do so, but yeah, the optics of the move are lousy, and turn the whole thing into exactly what he said in the first place. Not that he didn't already know it was going to go down that way, since he clearly had a backup plan in place!
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 1,799
    edited April 2012
    PS- As a quick digression, can I say I love the word "optics"? One of my favorite wonkish words. I am disappointed in myself that I didn't use it first. (This is what happens when I get behind on listening to On the Media!)
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