Episode 1215 Talkback: Spotlight on Spider-Man in the Silver Age

PantsPants Posts: 427
edited April 2012 in CGS Episodes & Spin-Offs
Wild Pig Comics' own Chris Eberle joins us to talk about Spider-Man in the Silver Age. The stories, the artists, the villains, the supporting cast and even the cartoon series are discussed. We cover from Amazing Fantasy #15 through Amazing Spider-Man #100. (1:36:43)

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Comments

  • mguy1977mguy1977 Posts: 734
    edited April 2012
    I am eternity grateful for my mom taking me to Spider-Man 3 & getting the DVD CD-ROM of Spider-Man comics from the beginning to around Civil War for me after the movie was over. John Romita Sr.'s artwork is drop dead gorgeous to look at. The Gwen Stacy, MJ Watson & Peter Parker/Spider-Man triangle is the will he choose this one or that one making it Marvel's best dramas in its history.

    Matthew
  • GregGreg Posts: 1,614
    edited April 2012
    Spotlight on Spidey! Can't wait to listen to this.

    Will we get any Hulk love for his 50th?
  • jaydee74jaydee74 Posts: 889
    Nice. I was a big fan of this era. I need to get some trades and interesting enough. I sure hope that some convention in New Jersey will have some at a decent price.
  • Web shooters and walking up walls? Are you kidding me? What kid could not love Spider-Man?

    My first encounter was the old cartoon reruns on Channel 43 out of Cleveland. Then I had a Power record where he fought Man-Wolf, and a Mego doll. The first actual ASM comic I bought at the newsstand was issue #141, which I loved and is still a favorite issue to this day:
    image

    The best thing was ordering the "web shooter" out of the comic book ad. It was basically just a sort of dart gun that strapped to your wrist, with about a 3' string attached to the dart. The first order of business, of course, was removing the string so you just had a dart gun attached to your wrist. I had ordered something else but it was out of stock, so they also included a typed letter "from Stan Lee" explaining that they'd instead sent three extra "Spider-Darts" for my shooter. My mom wasn't too thrilled with the value of the substitution, but since it was from Stan Lee himself I was quite pleased.

    I began drawing in first grade by copying Spider-Man from the upper left of what I believe was Spidey Super Stories #1, while being kept in from recess for some offense. An older girl (seemed like high school, probably 6th grade) who was watching me commented that I was really good at it and said I could be an artist someday. That settled it for me, and I never stopped drawing after that. Now I'm a freelance designer and illustrator.
  • GregGreg Posts: 1,614
    edited April 2012
    I got hooked on Spider-Man through reruns of the 60's cartoon. That show was on every Sunday after church and later would shown everyday after school and I could never get enough of it.

    Reading Spider-Man was a pretty big deal personally. I had a cousin that was every bit the bully that Flash was if not more and it was through Spider-Man that I started standing up to him. This would also lead to me getting into a bit of trouble standing up for other kids that I saw getting bullied.

    The first issue I remember having was #143 Spidey vs Cyclone.

    I had the Mego Spider-Man. i also remember having a toy Spider-Man speedboat and a car, it wasn't the Spider-Mobile but it was cool nontheless. Ohhhh and Spider-Man shrinky dinks.

    I've been reading the silver age stuff through the Marvel Masterworks and never get tired of it. Regarding art from that time, I will say that I like Ditko's Spider-Man over Kirby's Fantastic Four.

    I knew there were some tensions between Stan Lee and Steve Ditko but I did not know that it had gotten so bad that they actually stopped talking to each other. I think that's somewhat of a testament to just how creative and talented these two guys were at the time, to put out this caliber of work with minimal to no communication between them.
  • mbatzmbatz Posts: 43
    What a great episode! really put Spider Man in a new perspective for me. I'm not familiar with any of the silver age spider stuff (except for the watershed moments). the only continuous spider man I've read really, was/is the Bendis Ultimate run which I love. Now I'm wanting to grab some of those Masterwork editions.
  • mbatzmbatz Posts: 43
    And I agree, Spider Man's rogues gallery is aces, right up there with The Bat's.
  • JDickJDick Posts: 172
    Mike G...you are from Altoona? I live in Pittsburgh now but are you familiar with a little town called Roaring Spring?
  • Oh man i was always hoping you guys would do a spotlights on Spidey!!!!! Please go all the way up to the present!
  • LibraryBoyLibraryBoy Posts: 1,664
    Like Mike, I remember there being a whole lot of Spidey around when I was a kid. Between The Electric Company, the TV show with Nicholas Hammond (both first-run and in the many syndicated "movie" repackagings), the Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends cartoon, and all kinds of merchandising (particularly this big Marvel promotion 7/11 ran one summer), I remember Spidey being everywhere. The very first Spider-Man comic I ever got (and one of the contenders for my first comic ever, as I don't remember for sure) was an Aim toothpaste give-away where he was trying to stop the Green Goblin from stealing some dental laser. After that, I remember having a few Spidey Super Stories issues, too - one with Daredevil, another with She-Hulk.

    From there, I only ever read Spidey sporadically. Then, as now, I always liked him alright, but never enough to commit to reading his adventures for the long haul. Even when there's a Spidey book I like, I only seem to follow it for a short time, then eventually have enough and stop getting it. Unless it's cancelled out from under me like Untold Tales was.

    I remember buying a whole bunch of Marvel Tales in the mid-80s, though, not long after they started over in reprinting the Ditko material. The first one of those I picked up was the first appearance of the Scorpion, IIRC. Ditko's artwork looked so weird to me then, and I would go so far as to say I thought it was ugly at the time (look, whattya want, I was like 8 or 9), but there was still something compelling about it to me that I kept getting Marvel Tales for a while thereafter. It was all so very stylized, and yet it had a realism to it because he drew people who were thin or fat or old or young, and so few other comics artists I was seeing at the time did that. They all had basically the same body types. Ditko's people were as unique as actual people. And let's face it, no one draws flop sweat like Shy Steve Ditko!

    Looking forward to future episodes, and please please PLEASE be sure to bring up the Spider-Mobile in the Bronze Age installment. It's one of the great goofy comic concepts of all time, and it led to a rare comic book shout-out to my home town of Bangor, Maine, albeit derogatorily for reasons I've never understood.
  • Great ep, the enthusiasm was palpable through the headphones. Love all the talk!
  • Where can I get me one of those CDs or any other digital archive of AS?
  • Great episode guys. Love the silver and bronze age Spidey and am one of those rabid fans to have gone for a complete run. Can't wait till the next installment!
  • Guest Chris E. is always a joy to listen to -- knowledgeable and articulate. Thanks for the great Marvel history lesson, guys!
  • Just listened to episode. (Standing up. Begin slow clap. Break into loud applause.) That was great.
  • Mike G...you are from Altoona? I live in Pittsburgh now but are you familiar with a little town called Roaring Spring?
    Born in State College, raised in Altoona. Of course I know Roaring Spring!

  • Like Mike, I remember there being a whole lot of Spidey around when I was a kid. Between The Electric Company, the TV show with Nicholas Hammond (both first-run and in the many syndicated "movie" repackagings), the Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends cartoon, and all kinds of merchandising (particularly this big Marvel promotion 7/11 ran one summer), I remember Spidey being everywhere.
    holy smoke I forgot that!
    I had an entire run of Spidey Super Stories based on the Electric Company stuff!
    And that damned Mego figure was my best friend for years!
  • alienalalienal Posts: 252
    VERY good episode! And nice to hear Pants on a Marvel-centric one! (YAY!) As for me, my Spider-man journey started off with issue 51 (I think Spidey slugging it out with Kingpin on the cover) . Then because of distribution I didn't start a continuous run until about #70 and got up to #100. However, a neighbor gave me beat-up copies of #6, #24, #34 (Molten man?), 48 (Vulture?), 50 (Spidey No More) and 55 (Doc Ock again?). And I also got X-Men #35 in which the X-Men mistakenly think Spidey is a mutant. Oh, and I also got (and still have) these cute paperback-size books with issues 1-6 then 7-12 in them. Those reinforced my Ditkolove! Of course, I fondly remember the 1st cartoon, the TV show, and the Electric company appearances! Oh, by the way, Comics Buyers Guide #1688 (Apr 2012) has some good stuff on Spidey's 50 years.
  • CalibanCaliban Posts: 1,065
    edited April 2012
    Jonathan Ross (and Neil Gaiman) goes In Search of Steve Ditko


    Really worth a watch.

    For US viewers Jonathan Ross is sort of our version of Letterman. He is a huge comic book fan, and creator.
    He is married to Jane Goldman who wrote the screenplay for Kick Ass and X-Men: First Class
  • CalibanCaliban Posts: 1,065
    edited April 2012
    image

    The book I got signed at LoSCoCo
  • CalibanCaliban Posts: 1,065
    Just finished listening to this episode.
    A bravura, master class performance by Mr Eberle.
    ^:)^
  • LibraryBoyLibraryBoy Posts: 1,664
    Jonathan Ross (and Neil Gaiman) goes In Search of Steve Ditko


    Really worth a watch.

    For US viewers Jonathan Ross is sort of our version of Letterman. He is a huge comic book fan, and creator.
    He is married to Jane Goldman who wrote the screenplay for Kick Ass and X-Men: First Class
    It's a fantastic documentary and I don't know why it has never gotten a proper DVD release here. I don't even think it has aired on BBC America or PBS!
  • Neutron11Neutron11 Posts: 35
    Best episode in awhile guys! Can't wit for Bronze Age Spidey episode! By the way, the classic Spidey cartoon is on Netflix instant watch.
  • LibraryBoyLibraryBoy Posts: 1,664
    This episode inspired me to dig out the 40 Years of the Amazing Spider-Man CD-Rom set, and I was reading through one of my favorite early issues, #12 - Unmasked by Doctor Octopus!, and as I was finishing up the issue, I see that the letter column has a letter from a guy in Fort Collins, Colorado, named Dave Cockrum. And he's commenting on the snappy costume design of Electro, no less! You gotta wonder how much of the snappy design sense of Ditko influenced Cockrum's own work years later.

    Old letter columns are gold, my friends. Pure gold.
  • fredzillafredzilla Posts: 1,289
    What a joy this episode was. I'm a lifelong Spidey fan and I don't know why some people don't get into the character (*ahem* Jamie D.) :) Anyway, this episode also has given me reason to search through my books for all of his earlier stuff. I got the first Amazing Omnibus by trading a bunch of old floppies to my LCS. Years later the same store was getting rid of old stock and was selling the Marvel Essentials for $5 each. I picked up Vols. 3-7 (all they had left)! I've got so much to read but I plan on digging into these soon. I don't have a bucket list, but if I did I think mine would include reading the whole run of ASM.

    I can't wait for all of the other episodes.
  • Caliban -- thanks for embedding the full "In Search of Steve Ditko" video. It was definitely cool, and I came away with a much greater appreciation for him and his work.
  • WebheadWebhead Posts: 395
    Great episode guys.

    Love all the love for Ditko, even though I prefer Romita Sr. I give it to Steve for his designs of Spidey's rogue gallery. Fifty years later and for the most part they are still being used as he first drew them.

    As much as Spidey owes his costume design and villains to Ditko, Romita brought a fluidity to Spider-Man. Not to take anything away from Steve but John's Spidey's fight scene he moved more like an acrobate with one move blending in with the next.

    Can't wait for the next episode, the bronze age is in my wheelhouse.
  • MiraclemetMiraclemet Posts: 258
    Ditko created so many memorable characters, but to me what rally gave Spidey legs was the work Lee & Romita did to build the modern world of Peter Parker. Sure it was a bit soap-opera-y, but those Soap Opera's stayed on the air for like 40 years....

    My Volume 2 Spider-Man omnibus will be in this months DCBS shipment, and I cant wait to read it. Romitas covers to #39 & 40 are two of my favorite in all of comics history, and to think they were his first two Spidy covers (not counting the Daredevil one!)
  • MiraclemetMiraclemet Posts: 258

    image
    Publish Date of Feb 1975 this is my "birthday" comics (the one that came out the month I was born (and yes I know that the publish date is more like the date that the comic should stay on the stands 'till, but whatever. It says Feb 1975!)
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